Author Archives: Clinton Golding

About Clinton Golding

Clinton Golding is Associate Professor at the University of Otago Higher Education Development Centre. His previous positions include Philosopher in Residence at Rangitoto College in Auckland, and Thinking Coordinator at Queen Margaret College in Wellington and St. Cuthbert’s College in Auckland, where he worked to develop the thinking of staff and students. He was also a senior lecturer at The University of Melbourne where he received 5 local and national teaching awards.

Thirsty learners

They say you can lead your students to knowledge but you can’t make them drink. True, but misleading. You can also make your students want to drink by offering them a tantalising and intriguing fountain, and by giving them salty … Continue reading

Posted in Learning, Planning teaching, Students

Reinvigorating reading

I recently discovered that reading a good book about teaching revitalised me when I was tired. So now, rather than shelving my reading because I have other work to do, I sometimes pick up a book so I can build the energy … Continue reading

Posted in Book review, Uncategorized

Disobedient Teaching

Welby Ings (2017) Disobedient Teaching, Otago: University of Otago Press.   Welby Ings doesn’t tell you how to be a teacher, he shows you who you can be. Disobedient Teaching was profound not because of what Ings was saying but … Continue reading

Posted in Book review

Big picture or detail? Where to start course planning?

Sometimes we organise our courses according to a hierarchy of learning outcomes, such as Blooms Taxonomy of Learning Objectives. We use the hierarchy to identify the level of outcome we want from our students: Do we want them to merely … Continue reading

Posted in Planning teaching

Let me be clear! How do I tell when I need to clarify my writing?

I taught a workshop for supervisors recently about assisting your students to write. I said that one reason why our students write badly is because they cannot tell whether their writing is good enough. When they read their own writing … Continue reading

Posted in Reflection and improvement, Writing

Framing your advice for thesis writers: What would your examiners think?

I stumbled across a useful trick for cultivating good writing for thesis students. If I frame my writing advice as ‘this will help you deal with your examiners’ then thesis students are more likely to act on the advice. My … Continue reading

Posted in Writing

Ah-ha!

How common is it to have ‘ah-ha!’ moments as a result of reflective thinking? There seems to be an assumption that reflection should lead to profound, transformative insights. This is even given as a reason against using reflection in teacher education … Continue reading

Posted in Reflection and improvement